Tuesday, November 17, 2009

This is Who I Am

After almost twenty years in the States I often still feel like a foreigner, and that has nothing to do with the reception I've had here. It's more to do with my frame of reference, or rather, lack of. I've often lamented that I can't say "I have one specially prepared here" (Blue Peter) or refer to "sticky back plastic" (ditto) as no one has a clue what I mean.

Over at Almost American, there is, basically, my childhood in a post. I must say, I knew the actors in the 40s and 50s talked a bit differently, you know, a bit like the Royal Family; but I had no idea it carried over into the 60s. Just have a listen to some of the voice overs.

My Little Guy was particularly interested in the Clangers and StingRay, but on the whole, when I insisted that Americans (ie. husband and teenagers) sit down and watch what I grew up with, they rolled their eyes.

I mean - a weed? Little Weed? WTF?

14 comments:

  1. I agree - I loved that post too. I hate the fact that my earliest of childhood cultural references mean nothing to my peers here - yet elicit instant giggles and bonding to anyone of a similar age back home. I went to see the film The Damned United a couple of weeks ago. Alone. I couldn't think of anyone else who it would mean anything to, apart from ex. I really enjoyed the film but couldn't help feeling isolated when I left, that these memories were meaningless to everyone else that I am surrounded by. ho hum.

    ReplyDelete
  2. And these are the things that make us Brits what we are! Off to check it out tx

    ReplyDelete
  3. that's a trip down memory lane for sure. i remember all of them but remember this theme song particularly. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmVkn9ULqNI

    ReplyDelete
  4. Completely agree--no matter how long you live somewhere its the lack of shared cultural history that is always missing. And having children means you can gloss over it!

    I remember staring blankly at a video a friend bought for my daughter 'all the best children's BBC shows!' she exclaimed--WTF is a Soup Dragon?! I grew to enjoy it, but I missed not being able to share Sesame Street with my daughter. Sort of. ;)

    ReplyDelete
  5. Blasts from the past all of them - thankyou for the pointer!

    ReplyDelete
  6. I always think when I hear a newsreel from the past..... *What dreadful accents. Like having a plum in your mouth.* Anyone who was anyone had to talk like that.
    Thank Goodness we have accents over here and that everyone seems to accept them no matter where you come from and that no one on TV or radio has to speak like they did in the past!
    As for little weed.... well yes that was the limit even then....... but my son loved it!

    Nuts in May

    ReplyDelete
  7. I tried to introduce Son of Thor to the Clangers, but he complained they were making funny noises and dragons don't like soup - everybody knows that. Apparently..

    Nationalistic mini Italian philistine that he is.

    ReplyDelete
  8. That would be really wierd but there again I don't think my children understand either because they are too young...

    ReplyDelete
  9. THAT is what makes growing up overseas very difficult. I have an American family, I have spent most of my life here, but the fact that my developmental years were spent in Indonesia changed my frame of reference so much that I have never felt at home in my own country.

    It's the worst thing about growing up overseas. Everything else is wonderful (except goodbyes!).

    ReplyDelete
  10. What would they make of Andy Pandy?

    ReplyDelete
  11. The children rushed in to see what I was watching on the computer, but didn't stay long. It's obviously all too British or too ancient for them!

    It did start me pondering over other shared phrases (not just from pre-school programmes) so there are another couple of blog posts on the way. Feel free to chip in and add more phrases remembered!

    Oh, and here's a show you might remember Expat Mum, without the plummy accents!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Oh yes. The only thing was that James Bolam just missed the real Geordie accent and ended up sounding like he was from Middlesborough or Sunderland. Very irritating.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I just love The Clangers. May have to get my boys to watch an episode.

    ReplyDelete

The more the merrier....

Blog Archive